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Cyndi Lauper on Madonna: “She was a Hero!”

“I thought of them with pretty great regard,” she said. (referring to Madonna, Prince and Boy George)

“[Prince’s] music has always been a part of my musical landscape, as was Madonna.”

She added: “I got to say, I fool around and say she was my evil cousin but when she did Like A prayer, my Catholic schoolgirl heart was… I loved her! She was a hero, right? She got everyone upset. That was so good. Right?”

Daily Mail

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Village Voice: Memories of Madonna

Madonna in Village Voice

Michael Musto recounted a few of his most notorious encounters with Madonna for the latest issue of Village Voice:

In the early 1980s, I found myself on a double bill with a rising singer I’d never heard of; her name was Madonna. My Motown cover band had equal billing, but that clearly eluded Madonna’s team, who saw the downtown club gig as a showcase for her and her alone. Madonna sound-checked with such elaborate precision that my band never got to do so; by the time she was obsessively through with the mic, the doors were opening to the public and we were fucked. What’s more, after our performance, Madonna’s manager didn’t want us greeting guests in the joint dressing room, because the apparently demure Madge was getting ready for her set and didn’t want to change in front of strangers. I demanded my rights, while thinking, “This creature isn’t going anywhere.” I should have realized then that it was just this kind of aggressive tunnel vision that would rocket her to the pantheon.

Madonna was suddenly everywhere on the club scene, but her first single, the 1982 ditty “Everybody,” was so insistently whiny, I still wasn’t convinced she had a snowball’s chance. But she made it, with artfully done videos, rampant sexuality, and an ability to charm people’s pants off with feisty frankness. She even tried Hollywood, bombing out with stuff like the screwball comedy Who’s That Girl? while never letting people see her sweat. By 1987, I was hooked, so I went to see Madonna promote the movie outside a theater in Times Square, where she told the assembled throngs, “Shut up, so I can talk.” The steely determination was impressive.

Madonna in Village Voice

She struck up a sensational gal-pal relationship with lesbian comic Sandra Bernhard, indulging in all sorts of innuendo that got the media and public panting. The two stars were at the center of 1989’s “Don’t Bungle the Jungle” — a BAM benefit for the Brazilian rainforest — where their sardonic antics upstaged ecological issues. After Madonna rattled off some rainforest facts, Sandra moaned, “Who the fuck do you think you are, Tracy Chapman?” “No,” replied Madonna. “I’m not working at a convenience store. But I do like to sneak off to a 7-Eleven at night for some jawbreakers.” “The bitch is cold,” Sandra interjected. “Funky cold Medina.” They launched into a version of “I Got You Babe,” and the comic sang, “I know we don’t have a cock, but at least I’m sure of all the things we got.” “Don’t believe the stories,” urged Madonna as the show wound down. “Believe the stories,” implored Sandra.

When I interviewed Sandra for my Voice column, she claimed their lesbian shenanigans were just shtick and people should relax about it. “I mean, God, you know, Madonna is a raging lesbian!” she said, eyes rolling. “I mean why don’t they take it really literally!” But when Madonna was spotted wildly making out with Sandra’s ex-girlfriend Ingrid Casares, I took the denials with a grain of potpourri. read more →

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Q&A with Alek Keshishian on Madonna, “Truth or Dare”

Truth or Dare is one of the few documentaries whose legacy, it seems to me, continues to evolve. Madonna is still adding to her own legend, and Truth or Dare had such specific insight into her ambition, her sense of self, and even gay culture thanks to her dancers. How do you think the movie’s legacy continues to endure, especially in recent years?

Gosh, I’ll be honest with you. It’s not something I really think about. I kind of feel like that process is up to the individual. I’d say the most significant realization is when I meet people who say that the movie kept them alive in some way. It’s usually gay people, and they basically say it made them feel they weren’t alone in a time when they were vulnerable. That’s amazing to me, that that legacy lives on. We forgot that some of the stuff that we were making at the time was incredibly controversial for a mainstream film and a mainstream star. It’s that legacy that was the most significant for me, but I don’t know if that’s changed. I don’t even know if people watch the movie anymore.

It feels like this movie captures a hundred different storylines — about Madonna, her dancers, her crew and her family. Did you worry that wouldn’t cohere?

When I was shooting it, there was always that frustration: You’ve got a crew, you’ve got cameras, lights. It takes a certain amount of time to get to things. I probably missed 90% of the stuff, even if we shot 200+ hours of film. Then you realize that in the 10% you’re getting, hopefully there’s a way to show in a microcosm, two hours, the whole that you missed. That was my view while shooting. The thing about the documentary that made it so challenging is I tended to edit while I was shooting. Madonna tended up to bring up things, like her friend from high school. I would think, “Oh, we need to bring her in. We need to have her see Madonna.” There were points in the shooting where I thought, “We’re not getting enough of her vulnerability.” I have all this funny stuff and tough-person stuff, but I was missing a side of her that I knew by that point. A documentary is really about the relationship between the documentarian and the subject; that creates what you end up seeing. At that point, Madonna and I spoke every morning before she did anything and every night — just as friends catching up. There was a vulnerability to her, especially in the mornings. People didn’t get to see that, and that’s why I decided to shoot the mornings in her suite where she’s waking up and we hear all those voices talking about her. That was one of the few things that I shot where I didn’t place myself in the room. I knew if I placed myself in the room, she’d kind of be communicating to me. I was literally standing outside the suite and my film guys were in there. We got these beautiful images of her alone in this giant space, which to me was the metaphor. I think one of her people goes, “I think she’s this little girl lost in this huge storm.” Those are the kind of ways you try to create in a microcosm the fullest portrait of the person.

Madonna in 'Truth or Dare' read more →

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Preview: Madonna in Love Magazine

It’s here. The secret project between LOVE and Mert Alas titled LOVE 16.5. The special edition collectors issue ‘LOVE by Mert Alas’ supported by Marc Jacobs launches on 19th September during London Fashion Week.

Without any hair, make up or styling, cover star Madonna, shot by Mert Alas, is seen sucking her thumb in bed, wearing a hooded sweatshirt by Palace. ‘Madonna 2:00AM by Mert Alas’ is a 10-page reportage that the photographer shot of Madonnna in the early hours at his Hampstead home.

Our Editor-in-Chief Katie Grand says: “In early 2016, the media was obsessing over the discord in Madonna’s relationship with her son Rocco. I was struck by how mean the press were about a woman simply going to work and wanting her son to be a part of it. I spoke to Mert about the possibility of doing a shoot with her, as he, Madonna and Rocco are all friends. I wasn’t sure it would ever happen, to be honest, but Mert said, ‘Let me ask M and Rocco.’ Much to my surprise, the morning after Madonna’s reconciliation with Rocco, nine stunning images of Madonna arrived via WhatsApp. They had been taken at 2am at Mert’s house in Hampstead where he and Madonna often hang out and have casual dinners.”

Madonna tells Murray Healy in the accompanying interview with LOVE 16.5 how “acceptance by the establishment equals death” and says: “I don’t consider myself a pop act, I consider myself an artist. And it’s an artist’s responsibility to be revolutionary in our work. It’s our responsibility, our duty and our privilege.”

On the burden of fame, she says: “I was already famous before social media, so for me fame isn’t the burden. Fame is the manifestation or the by-product of my work, and that was two decades before social media. Now to me the burden is people are more focused on fame than actually doing the work or being an artist. Now it’s easy to become famous. What isn’t easy is to develop and grow as an artist without being distracted or consumed with fame.”

Madonna also tells LOVE 16.5: “I like Instagram because it’s like keeping a diary and every day I get to share different aspects of my personality, my life, and what inspires me, what infuriates me, or what causes I want to fight for. It allows me to be mysterious, ironic, provocative or proud. I get to use it as a platform to bring attention to people or issues that I think are important. It allows me to be the curator of my life.”

Editor in Chief KATIE GRAND
Creative Director MATT ROACH
Editorial Director MURRAY HEALY
Production Editor MATT FIVEASH
Fashion Director STEVE MORRISS
Production Controller MARIE RHYS-EVANS
Commercial Senior Production Controller LOUISE LAWSON
Special thanks to MARC JACOBS

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Co-op slams Madonna for trying to skirt residence rules

Members of Madonna’s ritzy Upper West Side co-op want a Manhattan judge to force the Material Girl to play by the rules.
The pop star sued the board of the Harperley Hall co-op at West 64th Street and Central Park West in April for trying to enforce a rule that requires her to be “in residence” at the $7.3 million pad when any members of her family or staff are staying there.

“Plaintiff is a world-renowned recording artist, performer and singer who is constantly on world tours,” her Madgesty huffs in court papers.

“As such, plaintiff owns many residences around the world and travels extensively worldwide,” her Manhattan civil suit says.

The toned-down version of Madge’s favorite catchphrase, “B—h, I’m Madonna,” didn’t go over well with the board.

Madonna cannot “credibly claim she was treated any differently from every other shareholder,” the building’s lawyer, Patrick Sweeney, says in court papers asking a judge to toss the suit.

Indeed, the building rules don’t mean that her kids will have no place to go while their mom is out of town.

Her primary Manhattan residence is a $32.5 million, triple-wide town house on East 81st Street.

Madonna, 57, bought the seventh-floor unit that’s the subject of the suit in 2008. She lived at the co-op when she was married to Sean Penn.

The “Like a Virgin” singer has four children — teenagers Rocco and Lourdes and adopted 10-year-olds David Banda and Mercy James.

Sweeney also says that Madonna waited too long to sue — two years after the building-wide rule was enacted.

Madonna says she wasn’t aware of the new rule until November 2015. But that date “is still more than four months before she commenced this action,” Sweeney says about the filing deadline.

An attorney for Madonna did not return a message seeking comment.

Page Six

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Yohane Banda: “I have healed my rift with Madonna”

The father of Madonna’s adopted son has healed his rift with the superstar, MailOnline can reveal.

‘There was a rift and it has now been healed.’

Madonna took son Rocco, daughter Lourdes and adopted daughter Mercy to David’s home village of Lipunga, close to Malawi’s border with Zambia to see his family and receive his tribal name.

Yohane said any tension disappeared as soon as he clapped eyes on his son whom he had not seen since he gave him up for adoption at 13 months in 2006 when his mother died.

‘I am extremely positive about Madonna. I can do nothing but praise her,’ he told MailOnline.

‘I am happy. As far as I am concerned, I was told by Madonna that the boy will come back to me once he has been educated.

‘Nothing has changed in that respect. David was allowed to come here and explore, he said he would come regularly to the village.

‘It is encouraging, and it is what I have known all along, even though everyone else told me he wouldn’t come back.’

For Yohane, it put his mind at rest to see the ‘happy and harmonious’ family up close for the first time since Madonna, 57, was fighting film director Ritchie over whether Rocco, 15, should live in London or New York.

‘They were a joyful, happy family,’ he added. ‘They were very close.’

The brothers, who are said to be particularly close, were both given traditional names. David was named Sezangakhona and Rocco, Zwangendawa.

Mercy, meanwhile, had not forgotten the language of her birth and was playing with the children in the village.

Daily Mail

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Madonna and Guy Ritchie put custody battle aside

The film director was spotted at his London home loading a blinged-up gold Mercedes minibus for a family getaway

After months of wrangling with ex-wife Madonna over son Rocco, Guy Ritchie smiles as he enjoys the perfect Father’s Day gift, a weekend with his kids.

The film director was spotted at his London home loading a blinged-up gold Mercedes minibus for a family getaway.

Rocco, 15, helped him with the cases as adopted son David Banda, 10, larked around with Guy ’s three youngsters with second wife, model Jacqui Ainsley – Rafael, four, Rivka, three, and Levi, two.

His stepdaughter Lourdes, 19, ­Madonna’s daughter with actor Carlos Leon, also flew out from LA.

The get-together marks the end of a bitter chapter for the family which has seen the Lock, Stock and Two Smoking Barrels director and Madge clash over custody of Rocco, who looked thrilled to be alongside his extended clan.

Daily Mirror

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Bobby Brown on meeting Madonna

…as for Madonna, 57, Brown said their sexual encounter was “kind of weird, but you know, memorable.”

“We met through mutual friends,” Brown told Us. “One of her dancers was dating a friend of mine and I guess she told my friend that Madonna wanted to meet me. We ended up going down to the studio and the next thing I know, there was some strange things happening to me.”

Asked to elaborate, the singer said with a laugh, “Madonna is really forceful. When she wants something, she’ll take it.”

US Magazine

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Shirley Manson on Madonna, sexism

Madonna is one fifty-something musician who’s been very vocal about discrimination against ageing divas, but when asked about Madonna’s outspokenness on the matter, Manson says, “When I look at Madonna, I think Madonna should not give a f— what anybody has to say about her age. She should explore who she is now. It would be infinitely more interesting [than her] being concerned with whether we find her sexy or not. She’s got so much more to offer than that. She should be like, ‘Kiss my ass. I’m Madonna. I may be old, but I will always have my legacy behind me and you motherf—ers won’t!’ I don’t know why she cares so much.”

Manson does acknowledge that being known as a sex symbol is “a hard thing to give up on” – not just for Madonna and other music stars, but “for every woman. It’s not easy to let go of that. But you have to have the confidence to make that jump and understand that you have so much more to offer as a woman than your beauty and your youth. That’s why I always encourage women to have a second act. It’s great being beautiful and sexy, but have something else in your pocket. Age comes to us all; we can’t escape it, no matter how much Botox we put in our faces or what beautiful clothes we wear… And let’s make no mistake: When a woman [who’s had work done] walks in the room, no one thinks, ‘Oh wow, here comes a 20-year-old!’”

Shirley Manson talks about Madonna

Yahoo Music


Forbes: Madonna is America’s Wealthiest Female Musician

The title of one of Madonna’s most popular songs is right on the money: “Material Girl.” With a personal fortune of $560 million, she’s one of the richest self-made women in the country–and claims the top spot on our first-ever list of America’s Wealthiest Female Musicians.

Though Madonna has been in show business for decades, her earnings power is as strong as ever. Her recently-wrapped Rebel Heart tour grossed $170 million, adding to her whopping career total: an estimated $1.4 billion on the road alone.

The latest cash infusion adds to a fortune already rich with royalties and the rising value of her real estate portfolio, which includes an outrageously large townhouse on Manhattan’s Upper East Side purchased at the bottom of the market, as well as a fine art collection reportedly featuring the likes of Picasso, Kahlo and Man Ray.

Her secret? ”I’m a workaholic,” she once said. “I have insomnia. And I’m a control freak.” read more →


Madonna wears Gucci at the BBMAs

It’s safe to say that B. Akerlund is having a very big year. After putting Beyoncé into that mustard-color Roberto Cavalli confection for Lemonade, the stylist was enlisted by Madonna to dress the icon for her tribute to Prince at the 2016 Billboard Music Awards. And judging by the Instagrams issued by the Queen of Pop leading up to Sunday night’s event—from lace layered under dangling crucifixes, to paparazzi shots of the pair in matching shades of yellow from the late ’80s, to stage pictures of Prince clad in thigh-high socks, bikini briefs, lace arm-warmers, and a fringed, beaded top—this was not an affair in which the costume considerations would be taken lightly.

When dealing with figures that loom as large in the collective cultural psyche as Madonna and Prince—both with their own distinct sartorial codas (and bestowed with such particularly unique lore)—the fashion has a lot to live up to. And thanks to Gucci’s Alessandro Michele, it did. Madonna took to the stage for her emotional, intimate tribute, singing “Nothing Compares 2 U” before being joined by Stevie Wonder for a duet of “Purple Rain,” in an embroidered metallic brocade three-piece suit with swirling purple paisley print and underlying frilled blouse—a look that, thanks to the film adaptation, is as synonymous with Prince as the symbol he once took on as a name. (And it’s worth noting that suiting made a few appearances earlier in the evening, in Kesha’s purple and embroidered white Gram Parsons–inspired versions, both vintage Nudie, and the ladylike Chanel take worn by Demi Lovato.) Michele, who has worked with the Material Girl before, most notably on Latin-influenced costumes for her Rebel Heart tour, perhaps put it best in the note sent to accompanying his sketch: “It’s more than a performance, it’s a real act of love.”

Madonna costume for Prince tribute


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