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Madonna News - December 2016

Madonna’s American Life and Music albums re-issued on 180 Gram Vinyls

Rhino has made it a point to reissue classic albums on 180-gram vinyl on a regular basis. These are the latest to get that treatment.

Madonna American Life Vinyl Re-Issue

AMERICAN LIFE: Released on the heels of Madonna’s theme song for the 2002 James Bond film Die Another Day – in case you’re wondering, yes, the track is included here as well – this was a concept album revolving around materialism and the American Dream. If you don’t remember it from its title track, then perhaps one of the other three singles (“Hollywood,” “Nothing Fails,” and “Love Profusion,” all of which hit #1 on the Billboard Dance chart) will strike a chord.

Available at Amazon.com, Amazon.co.uk, Amazon.de, Amazon.es, Amazon.fr and Amazon.it

Madonna Music Vinyl Re-Issue

MUSIC: Not only was this album both a creative and commercial success, but the title track of MUSIC gave Madonna another #1 hit on the Billboard Hot 100, making it an even dozen at that point. Beyond that, she also pulled a top-5 hit with “Don’t Tell Me,” with the album’s third single, “What It Feels Like for a Girl,” hitting the top 30. Meanwhile, “Impressive Instant” filled dance floors everywhere, and despite the fact that it was only released as a promo, it nonetheless hit the top of the Hot Dance Club Play chart.

Available at Amazon.com, Amazon.co.uk, Amazon.de, Amazon.es, Amazon.fr and Amazon.it

via Rhino / Amazon

Judge unimpressed with Madonna’s housing lawsuit

In the eyes of the law, Madonna’s no different than a door-to-door salesman or even a jailbird.

That was the position of a no-nonsense Manhattan judge who said that the superstar’s lawsuit against her Central Park West co-op to skirt building rules belongs in Housing Court with average New Yorkers.

“Let’s say your client were a traveling salesperson or away in college or serving a brief period in jail, wouldn’t your client be as protected then as she is now going on tour and spending an inordinate amount of time in hotels?” Judge Gerald Lebovits asked Madonna’s lawyer in court Monday.

“It’s the same principle,” he said.

The “Like a Virgin” singer is suing One West 64th Street over a strict residency requirement that says her children and domestic servants aren’t allowed inside her $7.3 million unit while she’s not there.

Madonna has four children — Lourdes Leon, 20, Rocco Ritchie, 16, David Banda Ritchie, 11, and Mercy James, 10.

The building’s board implemented the new rule in 2014.

“Certainly such a requirement is ridiculous and impossible for almost any family to comply with, and certainly not someone with plaintiff’s itinerant schedule,” Madonna’s April lawsuit says.

Her attorney, Stuart Shaw, told the judge that he submitted a sworn statement from his client that explains her lifestyle.

“She has homes all around the world, she travels extensively, she has a house in California, she has a house in Europe. She goes on tours, she spends an inordinate amount of time in hotels, yet the places she calls home is 64th Street,” Shaw said.

Judge Lebovits was not impressed.

“There’s a landlord-tenant relationship between your client and the cooperative corporation and they could bring a Housing Court action to evict,” he said.

Shaw argued that his international pop star client “should not have to wait to defend an eviction proceeding.”

The building’s attorney, Patrick J. Sweeney, said the suit should be tossed because Madonna waited too long to file it. In court papers he also argued that Madonna cannot “credibly claim she was treated any differently from every other shareholder.”

The judge said he’d issue a written decision to determine in the coming weeks.

Page Six

Elvis Duran on interviewing Madonna

“She was one of the most difficult interviews I’ve ever done. I was disappointed. She just wouldn’t give a straight answer. Maybe she wanted to be a bad girl just for the sake of being a bad girl. But while I didn’t love it, I’d still love to keep interviewing her. I want to get it right!”

“She’s a pioneer,” he says. “She pioneered that superstar edge that says, ‘I’m going to do it my way and succeed no matter what anyone says.’ And as much crap as she got for being herself, she never strayed. She was always true to herself.”

Elvis Duran on Madonna

People magazine

Camille Paglia hits back at Madonna

Madonna made waves at the Billboard Women in Music event with her powerful speech about sexism, ageism, and misogyny, but feminist Camille Paglia is hitting back at the iconic singer for her claims that she was rebuffed when looking for female support at the start of her career.

Here’s Camille Paglia complete response:

“Madonna is one of the most creative and influential women artists of the modern era. She transformed music and dance and produced stunning videos that were among the major works of art of the late twentieth century. She single-handedly broke the power of the Stalinist puritans of old-guard feminism and was instrumental in the triumph of pro-sex feminism in the 1990s.

Hence it is truly tragic to see Madonna descend into embarrassing displays of maudlin self-pity and irrational accusations against others. She is turning into a horrifying combination of delusional, vampiric Norma Desmond and bitter Joan Crawford on the bottle.

I was Madonna’s first major defender, when she was still considered a pop tart and a sham puppet created by shadowy male producers. In my ultra-controversial 1990 op-ed on her in the New York Times, ‘Finally, a Real Feminist’, I hailed her cutting-edge work and celebrated her embrace of sex, beauty, and Hollywood glamour, which had been under attack for the past quarter century of dreary second-wave feminism. I was widely attacked for my finale, which was dismissed as preposterous but which in fact came true: ‘Madonna is the future of feminism’.

It is absolutely ridiculous for Madonna to now claim that she longed to ally with other women at the start of her career but was rebuffed from doing so. The media, in the U.S. and abroad, constantly asked Madonna about me or tried to bring us together, and she always refused.

For example, in 1994, Esquire magazine asked me to interview her for a cover story, but she rejected the proposal. Instead, they got the geriatric novelist Norman Mailer, who knew nothing about Madonna or popular music, with predictably vapid results. HBO wanted to film Madonna and me conversing at a restaurant. Again, she rejected it. And Penthouse too proposed a joint cover story that was shot down.

The real issue is that while Madonna’s world tours have remained highly successful, her artistic development has been stalled for 20 years. The last truly innovative work she did was with electronica producer William Orbit. Madonna has become a prisoner of her own wealth and fame. Her most authentic ideas were inspired by her childhood rebellion against the repressive code of American Catholicism.

When she switched over to Hollywood chic Kabbalah, with its easy-going ethic and pat bromides, she lost her creative drive. Furthermore, Madonna seems to lack the humility and persistence that are required for the study of serious art. She collects art for display, but obviously it has not broadened or deepened her imagination.

The number one issue in Madonna’s current path of self-destruction is her embarrassing inability to deal with aging. She has failed to study the example of her great role model, Marlene Dietrich, who retained her class and style to the end. Madonna keeps chasing after youth, humiliating herself with vulgar displays, like the horrendously trashy, buttock-baring outfit she wore to the Metropolitan Museum of Art Gala in May.

She has become a cringe-making pastiche of ratty blonde hair extensions and artificially swollen cheeks, obscuring the magnificent classic bone structure that made her one of the most photogenic celebrities of the 1990s. In her struggles to stay relevant, Madonna has debased herself with adolescent, pitifully inept Instagrams that cannot compete with Rihanna’s brilliant work in that genre.

Instead of lugubrious rants and hysterical recriminations, perhaps Madonna should try a little honest self-critique.”

Daily Mail