all about Madonna

Madonna Interview : Genre Magazine

Christopher: What’s up with Maverick? Is there a game plan, are there movies in the future?

Madonna: Oh, Maverick films, yes. We have a film company which we’ve done in a very fly-by-the-seat-of-your-pants kind of way. We don’t have a deal set up with anybody in particular but we have nine producers, nine independent producers that all work in the Maverick office space. They don’t get paid a salary, they get paid a percentage of what they can put together. They’re all bright, they’re all really motivated, they’re all ambitious, and all of them have a movie set up. So it’s good because it’s very self-motivated.

Christopher: And music?

Madonna: Music. We’ve got Justin Case. Paul Oakenfold has a record out. We’ve got Michelle Branch, who’s doing very well right now. We’ve got Alanis still.

Christopher: Did MeShell just come out with a new record?

Madonna: MeShell N’Degeocello? Yeah. Lots of talented girls, just to name a few. And we’re struggling. We’ve taken a bit of a hit, just like everybody has right now, as you know with all the downloading, people downloading records. It’s affecting record sales immensely. And um, the stock market crash.

Christopher: I’ve refused to download anything from the Internet.

Madonna: That’s very nice, thank you. Thanks for that act of loyalty… I haven’t either. I’d rather have the CD.

Christopher: Frankly I don’t know how to do it. But I can’t bring myself to – it just seems so incredibly unethical.

Madonna: Yeah, well, anyway, we’re doing very well for a label of our size. We’re not really independent, we have Warner Bros. as our parent company. But there aren’t too many labels around like us, so we’re hanging in there and we’re doing good.

Christopher: Mario’s still there, right? [Mario Ciccone is the youngest of eight siblings.]

Madonna: Yes, and he’s doing a very good job.

Christopher: He’s still doing promotions?

Madonna: Yeah. He wants to get into A&R. He wants to move around the company. But he’s doing a fantastic job.

Christopher: Are you working on a new record?

Madonna: I am. I’m halfway finished. I stopped doing it when I was doing the play [Up for Grabs], and now I’ve got a couple more months of work to do on it, which I’m going to go back to.

Christopher: How did the play end? Has the run finished?

Madonna: Yeah, it’s over. They wanted to take it to New York, but I couldn’t do it anymore.

Christopher: They didn’t want to keep it going without you?

Madonna: I guess not. I don’t know. I didn’t really get into it. They asked me if I wanted to do it, and I said no. I thought about it for a minute, but the last couple of weeks of doing the play were really hard for me. It’s hard doing the same thing night after night. It really is. It’s eight shows a week in the world of theatre, and I never get to see my kids. I’d rather do a movie and come home at nighttime and put them to bed. You know what I mean? It’s a weird schedule. So…

Christopher: It’s a lifestyle, that’s for sure.

Madonna: Oh yeah. And there are a lot of people who dig it. But I’m not one of them. I do like being onstage though. Love that. Love that.

Christopher: I always said you belonged there. I just suits you. It perfectly suits you.

Madonna: Yeah, so I’m gonna go back in October to England and finish my album.

Christopher: You ought to work on some kind of theatre project that changes from night to night.

Madonna: Yeah, that would be nice. Or how about working on a theatre project where the shows are at six o’clock or four o’clock? [Laughs].

Christopher: I still think that working on something that changes from night to night might be kind of interesting.

Madonna: At least with live shows when I do my music I can change things. I can change a song. I can change the way I do it. I can sit still for it. I can move around for it. I can change my costumes. There’s so much more freedom, you know what I mean?