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Madonna Interview : USA Weekend

Q: And at this stage of your life, you’re prepared to have somebody else change the diapers?

Madonna: I’m prepared to have somebody help me. I certainly don’t want to not be involved with those kinds of things as well, but I have a job – I have many jobs – which means i’m not going to be around changing diapers 24 hours a day.

Q: You once said, “I was a motherless child” – because you were so young (age 6) when your mother died. How involved do you have to be so the connection is really there? Where do you strike that balance?

Madonna: I don’t have rules for myself. I want to be a good mother, and I want to be very involved in my child’s life, but other than that, I can’t give you details. I think I’m going to learn a lot as I go. I’ll strike that balance when I get to it.

Q: After the publicity tour for Evita, are you going to take it easy, be more with your child?

Madonna: I don’t have any plans. I’m reading scripts from other movies, but I haven’t seen anything I love. Plus, I don’t know what it’s going to be like to have a baby, so I can’t answer.

Q: There was a quote from you: “I think I help a lot of people, and it’s my responsibility to do that.” That you think of yoirself as someone…

Madonna: I have been a role model sort of inadvertently for people who want speak their mind. At the same time, though, it’s certainly not my job to think about every one of my actions and think about how it’s going to affect people. I’m an artist first and foremost. It’s absolutely nobody’s business how I choose to raise my child. It is my life.
And the other thing is people don’t know what my relationship with the father of my child is, and because they don’t know, they’re making an enormous amount of assumptions. If I were a man, they wouldn’t be asking me all the time. “Define your relationship. tell us how you’re going to raise your child and what you’re going to do.” I can think of a lot of celebrity couples who aren’t married that have children.

Q: Well, I criticized them in my article.

Madonna: Well, you actually have no right to criticize them. You really don’t.

Q: What about marriage? Doesn’t the marriage contract itself create a reciprocal responsibility, the same way record and movie contracts do?

Madonna: They’re created out of mistrust. Contracts are based on business contracts, and I refuse to look at the union of two people as a business contract.

Q: Well, it’s not a business transaction. It was a transaction created many generations ago for the purpose of raising children.

Madonna: I think our society is more comfortable with the idea of someone marrying and getting a divorce. We live in a country which refuse same-sex marriages. If two people are in love, it doesn’t matter what sex they are.

Q: In many communities, more than half of children are born out of wedlock. Many of these kids turn out great, but overall they have far worse odds of success. Doesn’t that worry you?

Madonna: You can’t just look at it and go, “Oh, it’s because the father’s not there.” There are a million other things that come into play. I can show you a billion families with a mother and father, and you’ve never seen such a dysfunctional and abuse and deceit in your life. So it’s got nothing to do with two people. Very often these single-parent situations are women who are trying to survive, and you cannot say, “You’re a bad parent because you did not try and make your marriage work.”

Q: I wrote an article: “There’s no reason Madonna should get married if she doesn’t want to, but it would be wonderful if she could become a spokesperson for marriage.”

Madonna: I don’t want to be a spokesperson for marriage, OK? I should be able to choose the things I want to be spokesperson for. Why can’t I be for the freedom of expression and for practicing safe sex and those kinds of things? That is freedom of expression – to say I don’t feel like I have to get married to have a good relationship and raise children in a healthy way.

© USA Weekend